The debate surrounding the number of games NBA teams have to play is around for several years. This, coupled with the fact that many clubs choose to rest key players is something that made many people reconsider whether this can work or not. The problem is that teams have increased their roosters to allow their players to rest for a game or two in a case if the schedule is hard.

This kind of reaction to the ongoing problem was as expected as fatigue made many stars inefficient and their overall stats dropped. This, of course, didn’t sit well with fans that wanted to watch their favorite players. They pay a lot of money for seats, and they feel cheated when their favorite star doesn’t show up in the game.

Two sides of the story

As with any issue, there are always two sides to it. NBA wants star players in all games, while their teams want them to play at their best whenever they are sent to the court. But these two aren’t compatible. The tight schedule makes it impossible for players to give their all at every game.


Resting players was the right of their clubs, even though they knew it would make their fans angry. But they couldn’t do anything about that. NBA responded to this by threatening with monetary penalties for clubs that rest players without sending a notice about that. But that memo did nothing but reignite the old debate concerning this issue.

What is the issue and are there any solutions?

The most significant problem in all of this is money. Both NBA representatives and club owners know that they can’t make any changes that wouldn’t affect profits. So, both sides are pretending that the issue isn’t in their hands. NBA officials try to force the issue on trainers and other staff because they don’t know what to do. They make threats with penalties and let those trainers decide what they are going to do.

On the other hand, you got trainers and other club staff that don’t want to have anything with the issue. They are doing what they can at the moment, and that is resting players. The obvious solution to everything is a reduction in the number of games. Yes, that would reduce the profits that NBA reaps from commercials, but that would make both fans and clubs happier. If that ever happened then, clubs wouldn’t have to rest their players and fans would get to see their favorite players at each match.